The History of St. Patrick’s Day

Back to Article
Back to Article

The History of St. Patrick’s Day

Nicole L., Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






However you celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day, whether you dress in green or watch the parade, there is no doubt that it has a mysterious history.

To start off, who was Saint Patrick? According to legend, Saint Patrick was born by the name of Maewyn Succat, but changed his name after becoming a priest. He is the patron saint of Ireland. He was born in Britain was kidnapped at the age of 16. He was then taken to Ireland to work as a slave. He eventually escaped but he returned to Ireland around the year 432 to convert the Druid Irish to Christianity. By his death on March 17th, 461, he had built monasteries, schools, and churches.

Saint Patrick’s Day, which takes place on March 17th, is a feast day held is St. Patrick’s honor. According to legend, St. Patrick died on this day in 461. It was declared an official Christian holiday in the early 17th century. The holiday celebrates Saint Patrick converting Ireland to Christianity and the culture and heritage of the Irish in general. A common legend says that St. Patrick was subjecting himself to a 40-day fast on a mountain. When he finished fasting and walking down the mountain, he encountered several snakes. St. Patrick was angered by the snakes’ look of evil and menace, so he chased the snakes into the sea and banished them forever. From that point on, there were no snakes in Ireland. The snakes could have been a symbol for  Druids, the people he was trying to convert. Although the history of St. Patrick’s Day is in question, this is one of the most common legends.

How does your family celebrate St. Patrick’s Day? Comment below on your St. Patrick’s Day traditions.

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email