Global Warming Strike inspired by: Great Thunberg

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Global Warming Strike inspired by: Great Thunberg

Josie K. and Penelope K., Staff Writers

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 Problems of Global Warming for Nations

 

     Pacific island nations like Kiribati, the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu – all threatened by rising sea levels – kicked off the strike. Posts online showed citizens chanting: “We are not sinking, we are fighting.”

In Australia, 350,000 people are thought to have joined protests across the country, with some local authorities encouraging school children and workers to take part.

The country is already suffering from soaring temperatures, and warming seas have contributed to the death of half the Great Barrier Reef off Australia’s north-east coast.

From there, demonstrations spread to cities in Asia, Europe, Africa and the Americas.

Students in Ghana marched in the capital Accra, saying climate change has sped up coastal erosion which is affecting people on the country’s coast. About 44% of the population of Ghana have not heard of climate change, one study by Afrobarometer suggests.

People in Thailand and India staged “die-ins”, falling to the ground and feigning death to demand greater government action.

 

The Leader of the Campaign: Greta Thunberg

      Greta Thunberg is a Swedish 16 year old environmental activist born in Sweden. She is the daughter of Malena Ernman, an opera singer, and actor Svante Thunberg. At home, she has persuaded her parents to give up airplane travel and eating meat to reduce their carbon footprint. She is known for her blunt public speaking to political leaders. Her campaign on climate change has gained international recognition. At age 15, Greta Thunberg was first known for her activism in August of  2018. She began spending her school days outside the Swedish parliament to call for stronger action on global warming by holding up a sign in Swedish saying “School strike for climate”. (See picture below) Although her campaign has gotten international recognition, it has some supporters and non supporters (see below).

Supporters and Non Supporters of the Movement

     While many people are supportive of Greta Thunberg’s movement and cause, there are still others who don’t take her seriously, including our country’s president, Donald Trump. In a tweet  he posted “She seems like a very happy young girl looking forward to a bright and wonderful future. So nice to see!” Also, Detractors have said she is being used by climate-change activists and is swimming in waters out of her depth. This is suggesting that she is not an independent voice. Fox News, meanwhile, apologized for a guest who called Thunberg mentally ill, and said he would never appear on the network again. Young people around Thunberg have tended to focus on emotional appeals in recent months, saying older generations’ refusal to address climate change properly is stealing their futures. Greta Thunberg continues to fight for what she believes in, despite what other people say. Greta Thunberg led a Global Warming Strike in New York City and was joined by an estimated amount of 250,000 people.

Impact of the Global Warming Strike

 

     To some people, Global Warming is a big issue that needs to be dealt with, while to others, Global Warming is not important. Global Warming has become a big issue around the world. The Global Warming Strike led by Greta Thunberg has inspired people to be more involved with Global Warming and understand what is going on, it has also inspired many others to participate in climate strikes. All over the world in Australia,New Zealand, Asia, Europe, Africa, and North America, and South America, students took to the streets to demand change. The organizers said that there were more than 2,000 protests in 125 countries. This means in one country there were about 166 protests. Many students expressed emotions such as anger, disappointment, fear and some hope. They hoped for a green economy within 11 years.

 

Definitions:

 

Environmental activist: An environmental activist or an environmentalist is a person who is a supporter or leader of the goals of the environmental movement

Carbon Footprint:  Carbon footprint is the total emissions caused by an individual, event, product, or an organization, expressed as carbon dioxide

International: International means existing, occurring, or carried on between two or more nations

Parliament: A parliament is the highest legislature, consisting of the sovereign, the House of Lords, and the House of Commons

Climate Change: a change in global or regional climate patterns, in particular a change apparent from the mid to late 20th century onwards and attributed largely to the increased levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide produced by the use of fossil fuels

Detractors:a person who disparages someone or something

Coastal Erosion: Coastal erosion is the loss or displacement of land, or the long-term removal of sediment and rocks along the coastline due to the action of waves, currents, tides, wind-driven water, waterborne ice, or other impacts of storms.

 

Sources:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greta_Thunberg?scrlybrkr=12b44d48

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmentalist

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_footprint

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:TAG_Climate_Protest_Future.jpg 

Oxford

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-49777279

https://abc7chicago.com/science/who-is-greta-thunberg-what-to-know-about-16-year-old-climate-activist/5564732/

 

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